Czech Republic/Czechs


Czech Republic/Czechs:
Development of a Nation
How Czech Republic became
Czech Republic,
and how the Czechs became Czech.


Czech RepublicHow
Czechs as a people, and the country of Czech Republic as a nation-state,
evolved and materialized into current form, in terms of ancestral
bloodlines, the Czech language, borders, culture, and even how they
received their name.


Ancestral Background
Development of Language
Formation of Borders
Etymology (How Name Received)
Culture
Czech Republic in 2008


Slavic tribes
Czech Ancestral Background:

  1. The Czechs were a Slavic tribe (separated from
    main body around modern Ukraine)that moved into the area of modern
    Czech Republic during the 6th century, filling the void
    as Germanic peoples were migrated west. Affiliated with the Slovaks,
    another Slavic tribe who would follow the Czechs, settling just east
    of them in modern Slovakia.
  2. In 833, the Czechs joined with the Slavic
    Slovak peoples to the east (in modern Slovakia), along with the
    Moravians (also Slavic) in modern eastern Czech Republic to form the
    Great Moravia, a medieval Slavic kingdom. Each of the respective
    constituent tribes maintains their separate and distinct identities.
  3. The Great Moravia broken up by Magyar
    invasions in 907. Czechs form into Bohemia (modern western Czech
    Republic) and Moravians consolidate into Moravia (modern eastern
    Czech Rep).
  4. The Bohemians (predecessors to modern Czechs)
    maintained close ties to the eastern
    Franks (largely due to their
    Catholic influence), becoming an autonomous region within the Holy
    Roman Empire in 1004. Germans would settle in the western regions of
    Bohemia, adding a slight German component to Czech genetic mix.

  5. Holy Roman Empire Expansion
    Moravia was added to Bohemia in 1198. The Holy
    Roman Empire assigned the March of Moravia to Bohemia, forming the
    territory closely equal to that of the modern Czech Republic. Czechs
    and Moravians (both are Slavic, but different tribes), would
    typically be consolidated into the same political unit, maintaining
    close affiliation with one another, especially since Moravians were
    speaking the Czech language by then, even though Moravians would
    still maintain a distinct identity.
  6. Bohemia (Czech peoples) would remain largely
    under Austrian control until Austria’s defeat at the end of WWI,
    whereby the Czechs, Moravians and Slovaks would form into the single
    nation of Czechoslovakia. The Czechs (with the Moravians) would
    peacefully split from the Slovaks in 1992, separating into two
    nations: Czech Republic and Slovakia, as Slovaks desired greater
    autonomy from the Czechs, who dominated the Czechoslovakian
    government. As had been the case since Bohemia and Moravia combined
    in 1198 under the Holy Roman Empire, the Moravians remain
    intertwined with the Czechs to this day, with more and more
    Moravians considering themselves to be Czech as the years pass by.

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Holy Roman Empire
Development of Czech Language:

  1. 3000 BC – The Proto-Balto-Slavic language
    (branch of

    Proto-Indo-European
    ) is spoken by Proto-Balto-Slavic group
    centered around Lithuania.
  2. After a split in the Proto-Balto-Slavic nation
    around 1000 BC, the language of those that migrate east and south
    evolves into Slavic (thus the origin of Slavic peoples). The
    language of those that remain in the Baltic region evolves into
    Baltic.
  3. The West Slavic peoples of Greater Moravia
    (modern Czech Republic and Slovakia) began to form their own
    distinct branch of Slavic by the 10th century.
  4. After the Czechs and Slovaks are divided
    during the 10th century (Czechs landing in German orbit
    of influence, Slovaks within the Hungarian sphere), the Czech and
    Slovak languages begin to diverge, although they remain mutually
    intelligible to this day. The Moravians, which become consolidated

    Holy Roman Empire
    under the Czechs from 1198 forward (as part of Bohemia – which
    existed under German “Holy Roman Empire” rule) also speak the Czech
    language, but with their own dialect. Czech would have more German
    elements embedded into their language than Slovak, as Bohemia was
    more profoundly influenced by Germans throughout history, being part
    of the German “Holy Roman Empire” from 1004 until its dissolution in
    1807 (and then ruled by German Austria until the end of WWI).

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Formation
of Czech Republic Borders:

  1. The Czechs were a Slavic tribe (separated from
    main body around modern Ukraine)that moved into the area of modern
    Czech Republic during the 6th century, filling the void
    as Germanic peoples were migrated west. Affiliated with the Slovaks,
    another Slavic tribe who would follow the Czechs, settling just east
    of them in modern Slovakia.
  2. In 833, the Czechs joined with the Slavic
    Slovak peoples to the east (in modern Slovakia), along with the
    Moravians (also Slavic) in modern

    Austria
    eastern Czech Republic to form the
    Great Moravia, a medieval Slavic kingdom. Each of the respective
    constituent tribes maintains their separate and distinct identities.
  3. The Great Moravia broken up by Magyar
    invasions in 907. Czechs form into Bohemia (modern western Czech
    Republic) and Moravians consolidate into Moravia (modern eastern
    Czech Rep).
  4. The Bohemians (predecessors to modern Czechs)
    maintained close ties to the eastern Franks (largely due to their
    Catholic influence), becoming an autonomous region within the Holy
    Roman Empire in 1004. Germans would settle in the western regions of
    Bohemia, adding a slight German component to Czech genetic mix.
  5. Moravia was added to Bohemia in 1198. The Holy
    Roman Empire assigned the March of Moravia to Bohemia, forming the
    territory closely equal to that of the modern Czech Republic. Czechs
    and Moravians (both are Slavic, but different tribes), would
    typically be consolidated into the same political unit, maintaining
    close affiliation with one another, especially since

    Defeat of Austria-Hungary
    Moravians were
    speaking the Czech language by then, even though Moravians would
    still maintain a distinct identity.
  6. With rise to dominance of the Habsburg Dynasty
    in Austria, Bohemia begins to lose autonomy in favor of increasing
    Austrian centralization. Austrian rule was established over Bohemia
    in 1526. Moravia submits peacefully, while the Czechs revolt
    feverishly. The Czechs would be defeated in each of their attempted
    revolts, and in the 30-Year War (1618-48), cementing its status as a
    province of the Austrian Empire.
  7. In 1699, Austria conquered Hungary from the
    Muslim Ottoman Empire, adding it to its empire as another
    constituent state. With this, Bohemia (the Czechs) and the Slovakia
    (Slovaks) are again brought under the same banner.
  8. In 1867, after Austria was defeated by
    Prussia, the Austrian Empire (including Bohemia) was forced to place
    Hungary on equal footing within the empire, changing the name to
    Austria-Hungary. Bohemia is subject to Austrian law, while Slovakia
    is subject to Hungarian law.
  9. Czechoslovakia is liberated from
    Austria-Hungary after it is defeated in WWI in 1918 at the
    insistence of the Allies. Czechoslovakia was

    Partition of Czechoslovakia
    formed into a sovereign
    nation, as the Czechs, Moravians and Slovaks all desired
    independence from Austria-Hungary. Bohemia (Czechs, Moravians) were
    much more industrialized under Austrian rule, while Slovaks were
    much more economically backwards under Hungarian rule. The Slovaks
    agreed to join the Czech-dominated state in order to attain a degree
    of sovereignty, since they were not capable (in terms of
    infrastructure or leadership) of attaining independence on their
    own.
  10. In 1939, before the commencement of WWII,
    Germany invaded Czechoslovakia, annexing the entire nation into
    Germany. The southern strip of Czechoslovakia was given to Hungary
    as an enticement to join the Axis Powers.
  11. The Nazi army was driven out of Czechoslovakia
    by the Soviet Army in 1944, restoring Czechoslovakian independence
    in 1945. However, Czechoslovakia remained under Soviet influence
    until the collapse of the USSR in 1990.

  12. German losses in World War II
    Slovaks in Czechoslovakia call for greater
    autonomy, resulting in a peaceful split of the nation into the Czech
    Republic (Czechs and Moravians) and the Republic of Slovakia in
    1993.

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Etymology (How
Name Received):

“Czech” is
derived from the name of the Slavic tribe who settled in modern Czech
Republic during the 6th century, filling the void left by
westward-migrating Germanic tribes, and who have remained the
primary inhabitants ever since. Self-appointed name.

Czech Culture:

The
Czechs have never been a military power, but they were nurtured as an
industrial giant during their inclusion in the Austrian Empire. As a
result, they are a highly industrialized nation, valuing education and a
strong work ethic.

Prague, the heart of the Czech Republic, is also a cultural center in
Europe with a large number of museums, galleries, and music clubs.

Czech Republic in 2008:


Economy:
One of the strongest
economies of all former communist states. A historically strong
industrial power, as much of Germany’s industrialization during the late
19th and early 20th centuries was located in Bohemia, the current Czech
Republic. Has diversified its economy since.
Government: Democratic Republic
Religion: Roman Catholic 26.8%, 59%+ unaffiliated, one of least
religious nations in Europe. Survey: 19% believe in God, 50% in some
other form of intelligent design, 30% atheist/agnostic.
Demographics: Czech 90.4%.
Foreign Policy: One of the world’s greatest advocates for
promoting human rights, regardless of prospects of doing business with
the ruling regime. Joined NATO in 1999.
Population: 10,220,911 (2008)



Formation of Nations (All European Nations)


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